LAG

Based on the IEEE 802.3ax standard (formerly 802.3ad), Link Aggregation Groups (LAGs) can be configured to increase the bandwidth available between two network devices, depending on the number of links installed. LAG also provides redundancy when one or more links participating in the LAG fail. All physical links in a specific LAG links combine to form one logical interface.

Packet sequencing must be maintained for any specific session. The hashing algorithm deployed by Nokia routers is based on the type of traffic transported to ensure that all traffic in a flow remains in sequence while providing effective load sharing across the links in the LAG.

LAGs must be statically configured or formed dynamically with Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). The optional marker protocol described in IEEE 802.3ax is not implemented. LAGs can be configured on network and access ports.

Note:

For details on LAG scale per platform, contact your Nokia technical support representative.

LAG features

This section describes hardware and software LAG capabilities.

Hardware capabilities

The LAG load sharing is executed in hardware, which provides line rate forwarding for all port types.

Software capabilities

The Nokia solution conforms to the IEEE LAG implementation, including dynamic costing and LAG port threshold features. The dynamic cost and LAG port threshold features can be enabled even if the second node is not a Nokia router.

Dynamic cost

Dynamic cost can be enabled with the config>lag dynamic-costcommand or by the action specified in the config>lag>port-threshold command.

If dynamic cost is enabled and the number of active links is greater than the port threshold value (0-7 or 0-15), depending on chassis-mode and IOM type), then the path cost is dynamically calculated whenever there is a change in the number of active links regardless of the specified port threshold action. If the port-threshold is met and the action is set to dynamic cost, then the path cost is dynamically recalculated regardless of the global dynamic cost configuration.

Enabling dynamic costing causes the physical link metrics used by OSPF to be applied based on the operational or aggregate link bandwidth in the LAG that is available at the time, providing the number of links that are up exceeds the configured LAG port threshold value. If the number of available links falls below the configured threshold, the configured threshold action determines if and at what cost this LAG will be advertised.

For example, assume a single link in OSPF has an associated cost of 100 and the LAG consists of four physical links. The cost associated with the logical link is 25. If one link fails then the cost would automatically be adjusted to 33.

If dynamic cost is not configured then costing is applied based on the total number of links configured. The cost would be calculated at 25. This will remain static provided the number of links that are up exceeds the configured LAG threshold.

LAG port threshold

The LAG port threshold feature allows configuration of the behavior, when the number of available links in a LAG falls below or is equal to the specified threshold. Two options are available:

  • If the number of links available (up) in a LAG is less than the configured threshold, then the LAG is regarded as operationally down. For example, assume a LAG consists of four physical links. The threshold is set to two and dynamic costing is not configured. If the operational links is equal to or drops below two, the link is regarded as operationally down until the number of operational links is two or more.

  • When the number of links available in a LAG is less than the configured threshold, the LAG starts using the dynamic-cost allowing other nodes to adjust their routing tables according to the revised costs. In this case, when the threshold is not crossed, a fixed metric (all links operational) is advertised.

Configuring LAGs

The following are guidelines for configuring LAGs:

  • Ports can be added or removed from the LAG while the LAG and its ports (other than the port being removed) remain operational. When ports to or from the LAG are added or removed, the hashing algorithm is adjusted for the new port count.

  • The show commands display physical port statistics on a port-by-port basis or the entire LAG can be displayed.

  • LAG is supported on Ethernet ports.

  • Ports of a particular LAG can be of different types but they must be the same speed and duplex. To guarantee the same port speed is used for all ports in a LAG, auto-negotiation must be disabled or in limited mode to ensure only a specific speed is advertised.

The following figure shows traffic routed between ALA-1 and ALA-2 as a LAG consisting of four ports.

Figure 1. LAG configuration

LAG on access

Link Aggregation Groups (LAG) is supported on access ports and access-uplink ports. This is treated the same as LAG on network ports which provides a standard method to aggregate Ethernet links. The difference lies in how QoS is handled.

LAG and QoS policies on 7210 SAS-T, 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE, and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE

In the 7210 SAS-T, 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE, and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE an ingress QoS policy is applied to the aggregate traffic that is received on all the member ports of the LAG. For example, if an ingress policy is configured with a policer of PIR 100 Mbps, for a SAP configured on a LAG with two ports, then the policer limits the traffic received through the two ports to a maximum of 100 Mbps.

In the 7210 SAS-T, 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE, and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE an egress QoS policy parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all ports get the full SLA). For example, if an egress policy is configured with a queue shaper rate of PIR 100 Mbps, and applied to an access-uplink or access LAG configured with two port members, then each port would send out 100 Mbps of traffic for a total of 200 Mbps of traffic out of the LAG. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that, a single flow can use the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that, the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports.

LAG and QoS policies on 7210 SAS-Mxp

In 7210 SAS-Mxp, a SAP ingress QoS policy or network port ingress QoS policy or network IP interface ingress QoS policy is applied to the aggregate traffic that enters the traffic through all the ports of the system. For example, if an ingress policy is configured with a policer of PIR 100 Mbps, for a SAP configured on a LAG with two ports, then the policer limits the traffic entering the system through the two ports to a maximum of 100 Mbps.

In 7210 SAS-Mxp, SAP egress QoS policy shaper parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all ports get the full SLA). For example, if an SAP egress policy is configured with a shaper of PIR 100 Mbps, each port would get a PIR of 100 Mbps. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that, a single flow can uses the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports.

In 7210 SAS-Mxp, network port egress QoS policy shaper parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all ports get the full SLA). For example, if an network port egress policy is configured with a shaper of PIR 100 Mbps, each port would get a PIR of 100 Mbps. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that, a single flow can uses the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports.

In 7210 SAS-Mxp, when operating in port-based queuing mode, the access egress QoS policy is applied to access ports and the policy parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all access ports get the full SLA). For example, if an access egress policy is configured with a shaper of PIR 100 Mbps, each port gets a PIR of 100 Mbps. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that a single flow can use the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports. Access egress policy override parameters configured for the primary port of the LAG are applied to all the member ports of the LAG.

LAG and QoS policies on 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12

In 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12, a SAP ingress QoS policy or network port ingress QoS policy or network IP interface ingress QoS policy is applied to the aggregate traffic that enters through all the ports on a IMM. If the LAG has member ports on different IMMs, then the policy is created for each IMM and is applied to the aggregate traffic that enters through all the ports on a specific IMM. For example, if an ingress policy is configured with a policer of PIR 100 Mbps, for a SAP configured on a LAG with two ports, then the policer limits the traffic entering through the two ports of the IMM to a maximum of 100 Mbps. If the LAG has two ports on 2 different IMMs, then policy is applied each IMM individually, and the policer on each IMM allows a maximum of 100 Mbps for a total of 200 Mbps.

In 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12, SAP egress QoS policy shaper parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all ports get the full SLA), irrespective of whether they are located on a single IMM or two different IMMs. For example, if an SAP egress policy is configured with a shaper of PIR 100 Mbps, each port would get a PIR of 100 Mbps. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that, a single flow can uses the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports.

In 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12, network port egress QoS policy shaper parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all ports get the full SLA), irrespective of whether they are located on a single IMM or two different IMMs. For example, if an network port egress policy is configured with a shaper of PIR 100 Mbps, each port would get a PIR of 100 Mbps. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that, a single flow can uses the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports.

In 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12, when operating in port-based queuing mode, the access egress QoS policy is applied to access ports and the policy parameters are applied to all the ports that are members of the LAG (all access ports get the full SLA). For example, if an access egress policy is configured with a shaper of PIR 100 Mbps, each port gets a PIR of 100 Mbps. The advantage of this method over a scheme where the PIR is divided equally among all the member ports of the LAG is that a single flow can use the entire SLA. The disadvantage is that the overall SLA can be exceeded if the flows span multiple ports. Access egress policy override parameters configured for the primary port of the LAG are applied to all the member ports of the LAG.

Port link damping

Hold time controls enable port link damping timers that reduce the number of link transitions reported to upper layer protocols.

The 7210 SAS OS port link damping feature guards against excessive port transitions. Any initial port transition is immediately advertised to upper layer protocols, but any subsequent port transitions are not advertised to upper layer protocols until a configured timer has expired.

An ‟up” timer controls the dampening timer for link up transitions, and a ‟down” timer controls the dampening timer for link down transitions.

LACP

Generally, link aggregation is used for two purposes: provide an increase in bandwidth and provide redundancy. Both aspects are addressed by aggregating several Ethernet links in a single LAG.

Under normal operation, all non-failing links in a specific LAG will become active and traffic is load balanced across all active links. In some circumstances, however, this is not wanted. Instead, it may be wanted that only some of the links are active and the other links be kept in stand-by condition.

LACP enhancements allow active lag-member selection based on particular constrains. The mechanism is based on the IEEE 802.3ax standard so interoperability is ensured.

Active-standby LAG operation without LACP

Active/standby LAG is used to provide redundancy while keeping consistency of QOS enforcement. Some devices do not support LACP and therefore an alternative solution is required.

The active/standby decision for LAG member links is local decision driven by preconfigured selection-criteria. This decision was communicated to remote system using LACP signaling.

As an alternative, the operator can disable the signal transmitted by using the power-off option for standby-signaling in the CLI command at the LAG level at the port member level. The transmit laser is switched off for all LAG members in standby mode. On switch over (active-links failed), the laser is switched on and all LAG members become active.

Note:

This mode of operation cannot detect physical failures on the standby link, which means that the network operator cannot be certain that the standby links are capable to take over in case of active-links failure. This is an inherent limitation of this operational mode.

When LACP goes down on a standby link, a warning message announcing that LACP has expired on the corresponding member port is printed in log 99 at the other end.

The operation where standby ports are powered down is mutually exclusive with LACP and, therefore, is modeled as a separate mode of LACP operation of power-off. For this mode, the best-port selection criteria can be used. This criteria ensures that a subgroup with the best-port (the highest priority port) is always chosen to be used as the active subgroup.

It is not possible to have an active LACP in the power-off mode before the correct selection criteria is selected.

LAG subgroups

LACP is used to make a selection of active links predictable and compatible with any vendor equipment. See IEEE STD 802.3-2002, Section 3, Clause 43.6.1, which describes how LACP allows standby and active signaling.

The 7210 SAS-T, 7210 SAS-R6, 7210 SAS-R6, 7210 SAS-Mxp, 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE (operating in standalone and standalone-VC mode), and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE (operating in standalone mode) implementation of LACP supports the following:

  • A specific LAG member can be assigned to subgroups. The selection algorithm then assures that only members of a single subgroup are selected as active links.

  • The selection algorithm is effective only if LACP is enabled on a specific LAG. At the same time, it is assumed that the connected system also has LACP enabled (active or passive mode).

  • The algorithm selects active links based on following criteria:

    • Depending on the selection-criteria settings either the subgroup with the highest number of eligible links or the subgroup with the highest aggregate weight of all eligible members is selected first.

    • If multiple groups satisfy the selection criteria, the currently active subgroup remains active. Initially, the subgroup containing the highest priority eligible link is selected.

    • Only links pertaining to a single subgroup are active at any time.

    • An eligible member refers to a LAG member link that can potentially become active; that is, it is operationally up. If the slave-to-partner flag is set, the remote system does not disable its use (by signaling the ‟Standby” bit using LACP).

  • The selection algorithm works in a reverting mode. Each time the configuration or status of any link in a LAG changes, the selection algorithm is rerun. In case of a tie between two groups (one of them being currently active), the active group remains active (no reverting).

LAG and ECMP hashing

Note:

See the 7210 SAS-Mxp, R6, R12, S, Sx, T Router Configuration Guide for more information about ECMP support for 7210 SAS platforms.

When a requirement exists to increase the available bandwidth for a logical link that exceeds the physical bandwidth or add redundancy for a physical link, typically one of the methods is applied; equal cost multi-path (ECMP) or LAG. A 7210 SAS can deploy both at the same time, meaning, using ECMP of two or more LAGs or single links.The Nokia implementation supports per flow hashing used to achieve uniform loadspreading and per service hashing designed to provide consistent per service forwarding. Depending on the type of traffic that needs to be distributed into an ECMP or a LAG, different variables are used as input to the hashing algorithm.

An option is provided per LAG to select the hashing function to be used for load-balancing flows on the member ports of the LAG. Users can use one of the available options based on the flows they have in their network and select an option that helps improve the load-balancing of flows in their network. The packets fields selected by the hashing function is different for some flows with the two hashing functions and is provided in the following tables.

LAG hashing for the 7210 SAS-T (network mode)

The following table describes the packet fields used for hashing for services configured on the 7210 SAS-T in network mode.

Note:

The following notes apply to LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-T configured in the network operating mode.

  • In the case of LSR, incoming labels are used for hashing.

  • The term ‟learned” corresponds to destination MAC.

  • The term ‟source and destination MAC” refers to customer source and destination MACs unless otherwise specified.

Table 1. LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-T configured in the network operating mode

Traffic type

Hashing options

Packet fields used

Hash-1

Hash-2

BDA

BSA

CDA

CSA

EtherType

Ingress Port-ID

ISID

MPLS label stack

Source and destination

VLAN

MAC

IP

L4 ports

VPLS service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (unlearned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

1

2

MPLS traffic (unlearned)

2

2

Non-IP traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned)

VPLS service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (unlearned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

2

MPLS traffic (unlearned)

2

2

Non-IP traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned)

VPLS service

SDP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

3

PBB traffic (learned)

3

Non-IP traffic (learned)

3

All traffic (learned)

3

All traffic (unlearned)

3

3

VPLS service

SDP to SDP

All traffic (learned)

3

3

All traffic (unlearned)

3

3

Epipe service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

MPLS traffic

1

2

Non-IP traffic

Epipe service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

MPLS traffic

2

Non-IP traffic

Epipe service

SDP to SAP

IP traffic

3

PBB traffic

3

Non-IP traffic

3

All traffic

3

MPLS – LSR

All traffic

1

2

4

PBB VPLS service

B-SAP to B-SAP (PBB BCB traffic)

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

L2 and non-IP traffic (learned)

L2 and non-IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB VPLS service

I-SAP to B-SAP (originating PBB BEB traffic)

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

L2 and non-IP traffic (learned)

L2 and non-IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB VPLS service

B-SAP to I-SAP (terminating PBB BEB traffic)

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

L2 and non-IP traffic (learned)

L2 and non-IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB Epipe service

PBB Epipe I-SAP to B-SAP (originating PBB BEB traffic)

IP traffic

L2 and non-IP traffic

PBB Epipe service

PBB Epipe SAP to B-SAP (terminating PBB BEB traffic)

IP traffic

L2 and non-IP traffic

VPRN service

SAP to SAP

SAP to SDP

SDP to SAP

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IES SAP

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IPv4 network port interface

Network port IPv4 interface

IPv4 network interface to IPv4 network interface

Network port IPv6 interface

IPv6 network interface to IPv6 network interface

5

5

LAG hashing for the 7210 SAS-T (access-uplink mode)

The following table describes the packet fields used for hashing for services configured on the 7210 SAS-T in access-uplink mode.

Note:

The following notes apply to LAG hashing algorithm for services configured on the 7210 SAS-T in the access-uplink operating mode:

  • The term ‟Learned” corresponds to destination MAC.

  • Source/destination MAC refers to customer source/destination MACs unless otherwise specified.

  • VLAN ID is considered for Learned - PBB, MPLS, Non-IP traffic in VPLS service only for traffic ingressing at dot1q, Q.*, Q1.Q2 SAPs.

  • Only outer VLAN tag is used for hashing.

Table 2. LAG hashing algorithm for services configured on the 7210 SAS-T in the access-uplink operating mode

Traffic type

Packet fields used

BDA

BSA

EtherType

Ingress Port-ID

ISID

MPLS Label Stack

Source and destination

VLAN

MAC

IP

L4 Ports

VPLS service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (unlearned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

6

IP MPLS traffic (unlearned)

7

L2 MPLS traffic (unlearned)

7

Non-IP traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned)

Epipe service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

IP MPLS traffic

7

L2 MPLS traffic

7

Non-IP traffic

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IES SAP

IPv4 unicast traffic

LAG Hashing for the 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12

The following table describes the packet fields used for hashing for services configured on the 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12.

Note:

The following notes apply to LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12:

  • The term ‟service_id” refers to the service ID of the egressing VPLS, Epipe, IES, or VPRN service.

  • The term ‟lag_index” refers to the Lag-IfIndex of the egressing lag.

  • the terms ‟encap_value” and ‟service_vlan” are based on the inner and outer VLAN values of the egressing LAG SAP.

  • The term ‟sap_index” is a value assigned uniquely for each SAP internally.

  • Parameters used for LAG hashing are the same in both SAP egress queue mode (SAP-based egress scheduling) or port egress queue mode (port-based egress scheduling), unless otherwise specified.

  • The term ‟learned” corresponds to the destination MAC.

  • The term ‟source and destination MAC” refers to customer source and destination MACs, unless otherwise specified.

  • In the case of a LAG with two ports at egress, different ingress port IDs may result in the same hash index, which causes traffic to always get hashed to only one of the ports. Load balancing is expected to occur when there are more than 2 ports in the lag.

  • The term ‟mgid” is the multicast group ID and is a software-allocated number. A unique number is allocated for each Layer-2 multicast MAC address.

  • The 7210 SAS supports Layer-2 multicast in a VPLS service. A group of 32 multicast IP addresses map to a single Layer-2 multicast MAC address. The ‟mgid” parameter remains the same for all IP multicast addresses that map to the same Layer-2 multicast MAC address.

Table 3. LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-R6 and 7210 SAS-R12

Traffic type

Hashing options

Packet fields used

Hash-1 Version 1

Hash-1 Version 2

Hash-2

BDA

BSA

EtherType

Ingress Port-ID

ISID

MPLS Label Stack

Source and destination

VLAN

MAC

IP

L4 Ports

VPLS service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (learned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

8

8

9

Non-IP traffic (learned)

All traffic (unlearned)

See note 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VPLS service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (unlearned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

9

11

MPLS traffic (unlearned)

9

11

9

11

9

11

Non-IP traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned)

VPLS service

SDP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

9

All traffic, excluding IP traffic (learned)

12

12

All traffic (learned)

12

All traffic (unlearned)

See note 10

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VPLS service

SDP to SDP

All traffic (learned)

12

12

12

All traffic (unlearned)

12

12

12

Epipe service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

MPLS traffic

8

8

9

Non-IP traffic

Epipe service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

MPLS traffic

9

11

Non-IP traffic

Epipe service

SDP to SAP

IP traffic

9

All other traffic

12

12

All traffic

12

MPLS – LSR

All traffic

8

8

13

14

VPLS (Multicast traffic with IGMP snooping enabled)

SAP to SAP

SDP to SAP

See note 15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VPRN service

SAP to SAP

SAP to SDP

SDP to SAP

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IES SAP

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IPv4 network port interface

Network port IPv4 interface

IPv4 network interface to IPv4 network interface

Network port IPv6 interface

IPv6 network interface to IPv6 network interface

16

16

16

LAG hashing for the 7210 SAS-Mxp

The following table describes the packet fields used for hashing for services configured on the 7210 SAS-Mxp.

Note:

The following notes apply to LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-Mxp :

  • In the case of LSR, incoming labels are used for hashing.

  • The term ‟learned” corresponds to the destination MAC.

  • The term ‟source and destination MAC” refers to customer source and destination MACs unless otherwise specified.

  • The term ‟service_id” refers to the service ID of the egressing VPLS, Epipe, IES, or VPRN service.

  • The term ‟lag_index” refers to the Lag-IfIndex of the egressing lag.

  • The terms ‟encap_value” and ‟service_vlan” are based on the inner/outer VLAN values of the egressing LAG SAP.

  • The term ‟sap_index” is a value assigned uniquely for each SAP internally.

  • Parameters used for LAG hashing are the same in both SAP egress queue mode (SAP-based egress scheduling) or port egress queue mode (port-based egress scheduling mode), unless otherwise specified previously.

  • The term ‟mgid” is the multicast group ID and is a software-allocated number. A unique number is allocated for each Layer-2 multicast MAC address.

  • The 7210 SAS supports Layer-2 multicast in a VPLS service. A group of 32 multicast IP addresses map to a single Layer-2 multicast MAC address. The ‟mgid” parameter remains the same for all IP multicast addresses that map to the same Layer-2 multicast MAC address.

Table 4. LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-Mxp

Traffic type

Hashing options

Packet fields used

Hash-1 Version 1

Hash-1 Version 2

Hash-2

BDA

BSA

EtherType

Ingress Port-ID

ISID

MPLS Label Stack

Source and destination

VLAN

MAC

IP

L4 Ports

VPLS and Epipe services

SAP to SAP

IP traffic (VPLS learned and Epipe; port-based egress scheduling)

MPLS traffic (VPLS learned and Epipe; port-based egress scheduling)

17

Non-IP traffic (VPLS learned and Epipe; port-based egress scheduling)

All traffic (learned and unlearned; SAP-based egress scheduling)

See note 18

 

 

 

All traffic (VPLS unlearned; port-based egress scheduling)

See note 18

 

 

 

VPLS service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic (learned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

IP traffic (unlearned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

MPLS traffic (learned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

17

MPLS traffic (unlearned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

17

17

17

Non-IP traffic (learned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

Epipe service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

MPLS traffic (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

17

Non-IP traffic (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

VPLS and Epipe services

SDP to SAP

All traffic (including VPLS learned and unlearned; SAP-based egress scheduling)

See note 18

 

 

 

All traffic (VPLS unlearned; port-based egress scheduling)

See note 18

 

 

 

All other traffic (VPLS learned and Epipe; port-based egress scheduling)

19

19

VPLS service

SDP to SDP

All traffic (learned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

19

19

19

All traffic (unlearned; SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

19

19

19

MPLS – LSR

All traffic (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

19

19

20

21

VPLS (Multicast traffic with IGMP snooping enabled)

SAP to SAP

SDP to SAP

— (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

See note 22

 

 

 

VPRN service

SAP to SAP

SDP to SAP

All traffic

(SAP-based egress scheduling)

See note 18

 

 

 

All traffic (Port-based egress scheduling)

VPRN service

SAP to SDP

All traffic (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IES SAP

All traffic

(SAP-based egress scheduling)

See note 18

 

 

 

All traffic (Port-based egress scheduling)

IES service (IPv4)

IES SAP to IPv4 network port interface

— (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

Network port IPv4 interface

IPv4 network interface to IPv4 network interface

— (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

Network port IPv6 interface

IPv6 network interface to IPv6 network interface

— (SAP-based and port-based egress sheduling)

LAG hashing algorithm for the 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE in standalone and standalone-VC mode

The following table describes the packet fields used for hashing for services configured on the 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE operating in the standalone and standalone-VC modes.

Note:

The following terms are use in LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE in standalone and standalone-VC Mode:

  • The term ‟learned” corresponds to the destination MAC.

  • The term ‟source and destination MAC” refers to the customer source and destination MACs unless otherwise specified.

Table 5. LAG hashing algorithm for services and traffic flows configured on the 7210 SAS-Sx/S 1/10GE and 7210 SAS-Sx 10/100GE in standalone and standalone-VC Mode

Traffic type

Hashing options

Packet fields used

Hash-1 Version 1

Hash-1 Version 2

Hash-2

BDA

BSA

EtherType

Ingress Port-ID

ISID

MPLS Label Stack

Source and destination

VLAN

MAC

IP

L4 Ports

VPLS service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (unlearned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

23

23

24

25

MPLS traffic (unlearned)

24

25

24

25

24

25

Non-IP traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned)

Epipe service

SAP to SAP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

MPLS traffic

23

23

24

25

Non-IP traffic

VPLS service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic (learned)

IP traffic (unlearned)

PBB traffic (learned)

PBB traffic (unlearned)

MPLS traffic (learned)

24

25

MPLS traffic (unlearned)

24

25

24

25

24

25

Non-IP traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (unlearned)

Epipe service

SAP to SDP

IP traffic

PBB traffic

MPLS traffic

24

25

Non-IP traffic

VPLS service

SDP to SAP

IP traffic (learned)

26

27

26

PBB traffic (learned)

Non-IP traffic (learned)

28

28

All traffic (learned)